Looking to the immediate future of our associations, we are faced with a tension. Our organizations are committed to expanding our membership pools and extending outreach while also continuing to engage, interact with and establish meaningful connections between our members. But as our communities grow, the possibility of really knowing our members and effectively responding to their needs becomes more elusive.

AI has the potential to play a huge role in overcoming this tension. Rather than robots thwarting personal interactions, AI technologies could prove integral to keeping our interactions with members valuable and relevant. When I look to the next 12-18 months, this is how I hope to see AI contribute to the association industry: With predictive analytics, we can continue to understand who our members are, what they need and how best to deliver it to them.

Through an organizational membership program, my association, ASAE, has almost doubled its membership in 15 months, growing from 22,000 members to 39,000. Everything about this organization thus has to scale up, from the range of communication with its members to the scope of the offerings available. While its output has to increase, however, the needs of each individual member – and their high expectations to have them met – remain the same.

Technological progress is the very reason people’s expectations are particularly high. Hyper-consumerism has made it possible for anybody to have anything they want at the click of a button, and to have their needs both understood and met almost immediately. Within this technologically advanced setting when data can be crunched and patterns of behavior be so precisely analyzed, consumers have come to expect services and products tailored to individual contexts and concerns.

It is difficult for an association, especially a large one, to carve out the resources to get to know members on this level, but each member – no matter the size of the membership – needs to be listened to and taken care of. AI could certainly help in this regard. Given that our organizations don’t have the time to talk to every individual member, AI can support us in continuing to foster the constant engagement people want, need and pay dues for. It can help us to know enough about our members that we can accurately and successfully scale up our products and services in a personalized way.

There are so many areas in the association space that stand to be transformed and supported by the contributions of AI, in the short-term as well as the more distant future. Within the next 12-18 months, there are tangible ways in which it can help my association better comprehend how to meet the needs of our members, and this is just one example.

In this way, and many others, the future of our organizations is already on the way.

Chief Information and Engagement Officer at ASAE & the Center for Association Leadership

Reggie Henry joined ASAE in November of 1994.  His responsibilities are to implement “exemplary” systems at ASAE that can serve as a model to the rest of the association community and to “ratchet-up” the use and understanding of technology among ASAE members.  He has been working with and/or for non-profit organizations since 1985.

Mr. Henry speaks regularly on technology and strategy issues.  Some of his most recent speaking engagements include the 2017 Abila User’s Conference, 2017 Association Executives of North Carolina Spring Conference, 2017 AMC Regional Meeting, 2016 ASAE Technology Conference, 2016 CESSE Winter CEO Meeting, the 2014 Union of International Associations Roundtable in Dublin, Ireland. In 2009 he was invited by the Secretary of Smithsonian to participate in Smithsonian 2.0, a Gathering to Re-Imagine the Smithsonian in the Digital Age.  Reggie was recently named one of the top 40 CIOs in DC-MD-VA area.

Mr. Henry holds a B.S. in Economics and Computer Science from Georgetown University. Mr. Henry serves on the Curriculum Committee and faculty of the Institute for Organization Management (U.S. Chamber of Commerce) and the Board of Directors of Educause, a nonprofit association and the foremost community of IT leaders and professionals committed to advancing higher education. He enjoys cooking, drawing, pottery and golf.

Reggie Henry joined ASAE in November of 1994.  His responsibilities are to implement “exemplary” systems at ASAE that can serve as a model to the rest of the association community and to “ratchet-up” the use and understanding of technology among ASAE members.  He has been working with and/or for non-profit organizations since 1985. Mr. Henry speaks regularly on technology and strategy issues.  Some of his most recent speaking engagements include the 2017 Abila User’s Conference, 2017 Association Executives of North Carolina Spring Conference, 2017 AMC Regional Meeting, 2016 ASAE Technology Conference, 2016 CESSE Winter CEO Meeting, the 2014 Union of International Associations Roundtable in Dublin, Ireland. In 2009 he was invited by the Secretary of Smithsonian to participate in Smithsonian 2.0, a Gathering to Re-Imagine the Smithsonian in the Digital Age.  Reggie was recently named one of the top 40 CIOs in DC-MD-VA area. Mr. Henry holds a B.S. in Economics and Computer Science from Georgetown University. Mr. Henry serves on the Curriculum Committee and faculty of the Institute for Organization Management (U.S. Chamber of Commerce) and the Board of Directors of Educause, a nonprofit association and the foremost community of IT leaders and professionals committed to advancing higher education. He enjoys cooking, drawing, pottery and golf.

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