“Star Trek” is pretty cheesy. You’ve got your spoon fed lines, terrible costumes, ridiculously fake sets and a list of horribleness so long Santa wouldn’t have time to check it twice.

With that said, I am a big fan of the ideas and concepts brought to us from the series and films. Those who watched relentlessly likely learned many lessons about humanity and saw glimpses of our technological future for the first time.

Ironically, it’s these very stories that I think are important to technology today. This is why “Star Trek” has always resonated with me.

I often think about the highs and lows of the first explorers of Canada (yes, I am Canadian) going through the most unforgiving terrain of rock, thick forest and giant lakes. At some point, they reached the prairies and couldn’t help but get excited about the endless opportunity and resources. They must have felt like they reached heaven. Then, a mirage in the distance seemed like some cruel joke. They thought the worst was behind them, but it was a mere cakewalk compared to what stood in front of them: The Rocky Mountains.

Somehow they continued onward, only to discover the ocean on the other side. Sound familiar? This is exactly the story of almost every “Star Trek” episode and movie.

In the midst of the adventure, countless discoveries and lessons learned about the never-ending drive of humanity, “Star Trek” managed to push technology like the early pioneers of Canadian expedition. The show pushed the technology that created it while also pushing what people thought technology would be like in the future. It was this forward-thinking that helped form generations to come. It helped us dream of the next iPhone.

“Star Trek” isn’t the only science fiction to do this. But the stories of discovery, learning, growing and dreaming for a greater future, where technology can help us become more human than human, is what really makes “Star Trek” unique in the world of tech.

The themes and concepts push us past the metaphorical Rocky Mountains and lead us to the next gizmo, app or dream machine that moves humanity forward.

“Star Trek” taught us to never stop exploring when it come to technology. Explore the tech you have, learn every crevice, constantly look and discover the ways new tech can help you work. Always remember that on the other side of each discovery is a new frontier. The final frontier only comes when the exploring is done.

In my association role, technology is a requisite. It has become the driver of my passion and work. I get to be a yes man. “Can we do this?” “Yes, I’ll figure it out.” Every time I learn of a new resource, I’m excited to see how I can apply it to what I’m doing.

And I want to share this excitement with you. I’ll see you on the other side of the mountain.

Not one for labels, Emery considers himself just another guy doing his own thing and trying to have as much fun along the way.

With a BFA in Film Production and Studies he has been working professionally with digital visual platforms since 2006. Backing those skills up by taking several other courses in Business Analyst, Social Media for Business, UX and even attaining a Freelance Business certificate.

Emery has been in the Association scene since 2010, runs his own small media business and works as a game day camera operator for a local junior hockey team.

Outside of work activities usually involve hockey/sports, music, movies, beer, nerding out on camera equipment or trying to escape it all by disappearing in some remote landscape.

Not one for labels, Emery considers himself just another guy doing his own thing and trying to have as much fun along the way. With a BFA in Film Production and Studies he has been working professionally with digital visual platforms since 2006. Backing those skills up by taking several other courses in Business Analyst, Social Media for Business, UX and even attaining a Freelance Business certificate. Emery has been in the Association scene since 2010, runs his own small media business and works as a game day camera operator for a local junior hockey team. Outside of work activities usually involve hockey/sports, music, movies, beer, nerding out on camera equipment or trying to escape it all by disappearing in some remote landscape.

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